TorrentsLib: Where the tags are poetry

TorrentsLib wasn’t feeling very well one day and didn’t show up to the internet. This led to a life of drugs and debauchery. From there they no doubt moved on to found a pentecostal movement adorned with flowers and butterflies. They left their site behind in the process.

So yesterday we featured TorrentsLibrary.  Today we are featuring TorrentsLib.  And the next day?  You guessed it: something with “torrents” in the title (in this instance, TorrentsLand.com)  It’s like a Torrents-related suite, or Trinity.  Fortunately, unlike the Trinity, this stuff is a little easier to explain (and I mean that with utmost seriousness.  Never understood that stuff.  I tried, Lord.)

torrentslib

TorrentsLib is like a companion piece to TorrentsLibrary, a good ol’ fashioned torrent searcher. It’s basic structure and layout is the same, although this is a bit more orange-tinted, and to these eyes, is a bit more aesthetically pleasing.  You can again search torrents by Music, Movies, TV Shows, Games, and Applications (actually less categories than it’s sister-site.)  This one has the tags front and center.  They’re irreverent.  (Someone is searching on my friend’s last name? Cool.)  Though I must say it was slightly distracting, in that I personally would be less inclined to immediately click on the keyword; my inclination would be to search the most popular torrents listed below the tag cloud.

You can scroll by most popular TV shows, music, games, books, and applications.   Below another cloud tag – which I’ll get to in a second – are the most popular downloads.   Again, like the previous site, TorrentsLib is clean and efficient.  It makes the process of downloading this stuff quick and painless.  And, as with it’s sister torrent searcher, it also has some very helpful FAQs to help you through the proceedings.

And the more I look at it, the more I like the cloud tags.  To the untrained eye, it looks a bit jumbled, a bit chaotic, but to a trained eye like mine, man, it reads like an incredible Dadaist poem if taken properly.  Check it:

joe cocker with a little
guerilla warefare
strippers party
mr. meat 66

Somewhere Tristan Tzara is stoked.